What to Mix Absinthe With

The traditional way of serving Absinthe is to use a method called The Ritual and to dilute it with water. Some people are bored of drinking Absinthe in this way and want to know what to mix Absinthe with. I hope that this information will help you to enjoy Absinthe even more.

Absinthe is a strong liquor which is flavored with natural herbs including grande wormwood (artemisia absinthium), aniseed and fennel. It also sometimes contains petite wormwood (artemisia pontica). The aniseed gives the drink its wonderful anise taste and the wormwood gives the Absinthe its characteristic bitter or slightly sour taste.

Grande wormwood contains thujone, named 3 thujamone or 3 sabinone by the book The IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry. Thujone is a ketone and a monoterpene like the other terpenes, menthol and camphor. Other names that thujone extracted from wormwood has been referred to as are Absinthol, salvinol and tanacetone.

Thujone is the reason why Absinthe was banned in many countries in the early 1900s. It was the thujone that was blamed for the insanity and suicide of Van Gogh and many artists and writers claimed that drinking Absinthe gave them their genius and inspiration through dreams and hallucinations. The famous Absinthe drinker Oscar Wilde said of Absinthe:
“After the first glass of Absinthe you see things as you wish they were. After the second you see them as they are not. Finally you see things as they really are, and that is the most horrible thing in the world.” Who knows what would happen after a whole bottle?!

We now know that Absinthe is no more dangerous than any other strong spirit like vodka and whisky, although it is twice the strength. Research has shown that Absinthe only contains traces of thujone and that it is not possible to consume enough Absinthe for thujone to have any negative or harmful effects. It will not cause you to hallucinate or go insane and is now legal in most countries. It is still illegal in Ireland but the Irish can order it from abroad and get it shipped for personal consumption.

You can make your very own bottled Absinthe by using Absinthe essences from AbsintheKit.com. These essences are made by distilling traditional Absinthe herbs and all you have to do is to mix them with vodka or Everclear – an easy and economical way to make Absinthe.

What to Mix Absinthe With

Now that Absinthe is legal in most countries, we can experiment with using it in cocktails or make classic Absinthe cocktails such as the New Orleans Sazerac or Death in the Afternoon.

Sazerac Recipe

1 teaspoon of a good quality Absinthe
Ice cubes
A sugar cube or 1 teaspoon of sugar.
1 ½ ounces of Rye whisky (not bourbon)
3 dashes of angostura bitters
1 Lemon peel twist

Freeze a glass in your freezer.
Swirl the Absinthe around the glass to coat the sides and bottom of the glass. Discard (or drink!) the excess.
Put the other ingredients in a cocktail shaker or mixer and shake for about ½ a minute.
Pour into the glass, adding the lemon peel.

Death in the Afternoon

5 ounces of chilled champagne mixed with 1 ounce of Absinthe – delicious!

Some people like to use mixers such as lemonade, 7UP and cherryade with their Absinthe and I have even heard of Red Bull being mixed with Absinthe! Be inventive when deciding what to mix Absinthe with, use recipes off the Internet but give them your own twist or make up your own. Have fun.

What to Mix Absinthe With

The traditional way of serving Absinthe is to use a method called The Ritual and to dilute it with water. Some people are bored of drinking Absinthe in this way and want to know what to mix Absinthe with. I hope that this information will help you to enjoy Absinthe even more.

Absinthe is a strong liquor which is flavored with natural herbs including grande wormwood (artemisia absinthium), aniseed and fennel. It also sometimes contains petite wormwood (artemisia pontica). The aniseed gives the drink its wonderful anise taste and the wormwood gives the Absinthe its characteristic bitter or slightly sour taste.

Grande wormwood contains thujone, named 3 thujamone or 3 sabinone by the book The IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry. Thujone is a ketone and a monoterpene like the other terpenes, menthol and camphor. Other names that thujone extracted from wormwood has been referred to as are Absinthol, salvinol and tanacetone.

Thujone is the reason why Absinthe was banned in many countries in the early 1900s. It was the thujone that was blamed for the insanity and suicide of Van Gogh and many artists and writers claimed that drinking Absinthe gave them their genius and inspiration through dreams and hallucinations. The famous Absinthe drinker Oscar Wilde said of Absinthe:
“After the first glass of Absinthe you see things as you wish they were. After the second you see them as they are not. Finally you see things as they really are, and that is the most horrible thing in the world.” Who knows what would happen after a whole bottle?!

We now know that Absinthe is no more dangerous than any other strong spirit like vodka and whisky, although it is twice the strength. Research has shown that Absinthe only contains traces of thujone and that it is not possible to consume enough Absinthe for thujone to have any negative or harmful effects. It will not cause you to hallucinate or go insane and is now legal in most countries. It is still illegal in Ireland but the Irish can order it from abroad and get it shipped for personal consumption.

You can make your very own bottled Absinthe by using Absinthe essences from AbsintheKit.com. These essences are made by distilling traditional Absinthe herbs and all you have to do is to mix them with vodka or Everclear – an easy and economical way to make Absinthe.

What to Mix Absinthe With

Now that Absinthe is legal in most countries, we can experiment with using it in cocktails or make classic Absinthe cocktails such as the New Orleans Sazerac or Death in the Afternoon.

Sazerac Recipe

1 teaspoon of a good quality Absinthe
Ice cubes
A sugar cube or 1 teaspoon of sugar.
1 ½ ounces of Rye whisky (not bourbon)
3 dashes of angostura bitters
1 Lemon peel twist

Freeze a glass in your freezer.
Swirl the Absinthe around the glass to coat the sides and bottom of the glass. Discard (or drink!) the excess.
Put the other ingredients in a cocktail shaker or mixer and shake for about ½ a minute.
Pour into the glass, adding the lemon peel.

Death in the Afternoon

5 ounces of chilled champagne mixed with 1 ounce of Absinthe – delicious!

Some people like to use mixers such as lemonade, 7UP and cherryade with their Absinthe and I have even heard of Red Bull being mixed with Absinthe! Be inventive when deciding what to mix Absinthe with, use recipes off the Internet but give them your own twist or make up your own. Have fun.

Whats Absinthe Effect on the Body?

Many people have heard that the drink Absinthe will make them trip and hallucinate but is this true – Whats Absinthe effect on the body?

Absinthe, otherwise known as La Fee Verte or the Green Fairy, is the drink that was blamed for the madness and suicide of Van Gogh as well as being the muse of many famous artists and writers. Would the works of Van Gogh and Pablo Picasso be the way they are if they hadn’t consumed Absinthe while working? Would Oscar Wilde have written his famous “The Picture of Dorian Gray” without the help of Absinthe? Writers and artists were convinced that Absinthe gave them inspiration and even their genius. Absinthe even featured in many works of art – The Woman Drinking Absinthe by Picasso and L’Absinthe by Degas. It is claimed that the predominance of yellow in Van Gogh’s works was a result of Absinthe poisoning and that Picasso’s cubsim was inspired by Absinthe.

Wormwood (artemisia absinthium) is a key ingredient in Absinthe and is the reason for all the controversy surrounding the drink. The herb has been used in medicine since ancient times:-

– to treat labor pains.
– as an antiseptic.
– as a cardiac stimulant in heart medication.
– to stimulate digestion.
– to reduce fevers.
– as an anthelmintic – to expel intestinal worms.
– to counteract poisoning from toadstools and hemlock.

However, wormwood is also known as a neurotoxin and convulsant because wormwood oil contains the chemical thujone which acts on the GABA receptors in the brain.

A 1960s article from “Sweat” Magazine tells of how the French medical profession, at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, were concerned about “Absinthism”, a condition caused by prolonged Absinthe drinking. Doctors were convinced that Absinthe was far worse than any other alcohol and that it was more like a drug. Doctors listed symptoms of Absinthism as:-

– Convulsions and frothing at the mouth.
– Delirium.
– Hypersensitivity to pain.
– Loss of libido.
– Sensitivity to hot and cold.
– Insanity.
– Paralysis.
– Death.

They claimed that even occasional Absinthe drinking could cause:-

– Hallucinations.
– A feeling of exhilaration.
– Restless nights and nightmares.
– Trembling.
– Dizziness.

We now know that these claims are false and part of the mass hysteria of the time. Prohibitionists were desperate to get alcohol banned, wine producers were putting pressure on the government to ban Absinthe because it was becoming more popular than wine, and doctors were concerned about growing alcoholism in France. Absinthe was banned in 1915 in France but has since become legal in many countries around the world from the 1980s onwards.

Research and studies have shown that Absinthe is no more dangerous than any of the other strong spirits and that the drink only contains very small amounts of thujone. It would be impossible to drink enough Absinthe for thujone to have any negative effects on the body.

Even though it has been proved that Absinthe does not cause hallucinations or convulsions, Absinthe buyers and drinkers still need to be aware that it is a high proof liquor and so can intoxicate very quickly, especially if it is mixed with other strong spirits in cocktails. So, whats Absinthe effect on the body? A “clear headed” or “lucid” drunkenness is how getting intoxicated on Absinthe has been described by those who drink bottled Absinthe or who make Absinthe from essences like those from AbsintheKit.com. It can also cause a pleasant tingling of the tongue but no hallucinations!

Whats Absinthe Effect on the Body?

Many people have heard that the drink Absinthe will make them trip and hallucinate but is this true – Whats Absinthe effect on the body?

Absinthe, otherwise known as La Fee Verte or the Green Fairy, is the drink that was blamed for the madness and suicide of Van Gogh as well as being the muse of many famous artists and writers. Would the works of Van Gogh and Pablo Picasso be the way they are if they hadn’t consumed Absinthe while working? Would Oscar Wilde have written his famous “The Picture of Dorian Gray” without the help of Absinthe? Writers and artists were convinced that Absinthe gave them inspiration and even their genius. Absinthe even featured in many works of art – The Woman Drinking Absinthe by Picasso and L’Absinthe by Degas. It is claimed that the predominance of yellow in Van Gogh’s works was a result of Absinthe poisoning and that Picasso’s cubsim was inspired by Absinthe.

Wormwood (artemisia absinthium) is a key ingredient in Absinthe and is the reason for all the controversy surrounding the drink. The herb has been used in medicine since ancient times:-

– to treat labor pains.
– as an antiseptic.
– as a cardiac stimulant in heart medication.
– to stimulate digestion.
– to reduce fevers.
– as an anthelmintic – to expel intestinal worms.
– to counteract poisoning from toadstools and hemlock.

However, wormwood is also known as a neurotoxin and convulsant because wormwood oil contains the chemical thujone which acts on the GABA receptors in the brain.

A 1960s article from “Sweat” Magazine tells of how the French medical profession, at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, were concerned about “Absinthism”, a condition caused by prolonged Absinthe drinking. Doctors were convinced that Absinthe was far worse than any other alcohol and that it was more like a drug. Doctors listed symptoms of Absinthism as:-

– Convulsions and frothing at the mouth.
– Delirium.
– Hypersensitivity to pain.
– Loss of libido.
– Sensitivity to hot and cold.
– Insanity.
– Paralysis.
– Death.

They claimed that even occasional Absinthe drinking could cause:-

– Hallucinations.
– A feeling of exhilaration.
– Restless nights and nightmares.
– Trembling.
– Dizziness.

We now know that these claims are false and part of the mass hysteria of the time. Prohibitionists were desperate to get alcohol banned, wine producers were putting pressure on the government to ban Absinthe because it was becoming more popular than wine, and doctors were concerned about growing alcoholism in France. Absinthe was banned in 1915 in France but has since become legal in many countries around the world from the 1980s onwards.

Research and studies have shown that Absinthe is no more dangerous than any of the other strong spirits and that the drink only contains very small amounts of thujone. It would be impossible to drink enough Absinthe for thujone to have any negative effects on the body.

Even though it has been proved that Absinthe does not cause hallucinations or convulsions, Absinthe buyers and drinkers still need to be aware that it is a high proof liquor and so can intoxicate very quickly, especially if it is mixed with other strong spirits in cocktails. So, whats Absinthe effect on the body? A “clear headed” or “lucid” drunkenness is how getting intoxicated on Absinthe has been described by those who drink bottled Absinthe or who make Absinthe from essences like those from AbsintheKit.com. It can also cause a pleasant tingling of the tongue but no hallucinations!

What is the Absinthe High Like?

There are so many discussion threads on forums about Absinthe and how to hallucinate by drinking Absinthe. Lots of people want to know what the best Absinthe to buy for hallucinating is and what is the Absinthe high like.

Unfortunately, these people are believing the propaganda from the late 19th century and early 20th century and also books like Doris Lanier’s “Asbinthe The Cocaine of the 19th Century: A History of the Hallucinogenic Drug and its Effect on Artists and Writers in Europe and the United States”. In this book Lanier talks about Absinthe being like opium and cocaine in its effects and that it caused a rapid loss of both physical and mental faculties. Is there any truth in this?

Absinthe was popular in a time known by some as “The Great Binge”, a time when heroin and cocaine were used in children’s medicines and in beverages. The medical profession realized that these chemicals weren’t as safe as they thought and they thought the same about Absinthe. They claimed that thujone, a chemical found in the wormwood in the drink Absinthe, was psychoactive and could cause psychedelic effects just like THC in cannabis. They alleged that Absinthe wasn’t just a drink that intoxicated people, it was also a harmful drug that gave you hallucinations and could drive you insane. Doctors even came up with a name for prolonged Absinthe drinking – “Absinthism”, which they said caused:-

– Convulsions
– Delirium
– Insanity
– Brain damge
– Paralysis
– Death

Really, “Absinthism” was just alcoholism, it was nothing special.

Many people blame Absinthe for Van Gogh cutting off his own ear and for his later suicide. But, can we blame a drink for Van Gogh’s madness when he had suffered from mental illness and depression since he was a child and when we consider that he mixed Absinthe with turpentine? I don’t think so. Absinthe cannot be blamed for the so-called “Absinthe Murder” either. A Swiss man murdered his pregnant wife and children after consuming two glasses of Absinthe BUT he had also consumed five liters of wine, six glasses of cognac and many other alcoholic beverages!

What is the Absinthe High Like?

The Absinthe “high” just doesn’t exist. We now know definitively from tests, that Absinthe is not an hallucinogen. Even pre ban Absinthe only contained very small amounts of thujone, nowhere near enough to cause any effect whatsoever. Yes, you will get intoxicated quickly drinking Absinthe, after all it tends to be about 70% alcohol by volume (140 proof) which is stronger than other spirits like vodka but you will not trip or get high.

Absinthe is called the Green Fairy but it will not make you see any fairies!. It does give you a different kind of drunkenness though. The blend of the high alcohol content, which acts as a sedative, and the herbs, which are stimulants, can give you a very strange “clear headed” or “lucid” drunkenness – an alcohol high. Perhaps this is what artists and writers were talking about when they described Absinthe as their muse, saying that it gave them inspiration and even their genius.

Make sure when you buy your first Absinthe that you buy a quality Absinthe or that you make your own from a kit from a reputable company. Some company’s herbal steeping kits claim to make an Absinthe which contains very large amounts of thujone, much larger than vintage Absinthe. Take a look at the essences from AbsintheKit.com which are also used by the Absinthe industry.

Although the answer to the question “What is the Absinthe high like?” might disappoint some people, Absinthe is a great tasting drink which should be enjoyed.

What is the Absinthe High Like?

There are so many discussion threads on forums about Absinthe and how to hallucinate by drinking Absinthe. Lots of people want to know what the best Absinthe to buy for hallucinating is and what is the Absinthe high like.

Unfortunately, these people are believing the propaganda from the late 19th century and early 20th century and also books like Doris Lanier’s “Asbinthe The Cocaine of the 19th Century: A History of the Hallucinogenic Drug and its Effect on Artists and Writers in Europe and the United States”. In this book Lanier talks about Absinthe being like opium and cocaine in its effects and that it caused a rapid loss of both physical and mental faculties. Is there any truth in this?

Absinthe was popular in a time known by some as “The Great Binge”, a time when heroin and cocaine were used in children’s medicines and in beverages. The medical profession realized that these chemicals weren’t as safe as they thought and they thought the same about Absinthe. They claimed that thujone, a chemical found in the wormwood in the drink Absinthe, was psychoactive and could cause psychedelic effects just like THC in cannabis. They alleged that Absinthe wasn’t just a drink that intoxicated people, it was also a harmful drug that gave you hallucinations and could drive you insane. Doctors even came up with a name for prolonged Absinthe drinking – “Absinthism”, which they said caused:-

– Convulsions
– Delirium
– Insanity
– Brain damge
– Paralysis
– Death

Really, “Absinthism” was just alcoholism, it was nothing special.

Many people blame Absinthe for Van Gogh cutting off his own ear and for his later suicide. But, can we blame a drink for Van Gogh’s madness when he had suffered from mental illness and depression since he was a child and when we consider that he mixed Absinthe with turpentine? I don’t think so. Absinthe cannot be blamed for the so-called “Absinthe Murder” either. A Swiss man murdered his pregnant wife and children after consuming two glasses of Absinthe BUT he had also consumed five liters of wine, six glasses of cognac and many other alcoholic beverages!

What is the Absinthe High Like?

The Absinthe “high” just doesn’t exist. We now know definitively from tests, that Absinthe is not an hallucinogen. Even pre ban Absinthe only contained very small amounts of thujone, nowhere near enough to cause any effect whatsoever. Yes, you will get intoxicated quickly drinking Absinthe, after all it tends to be about 70% alcohol by volume (140 proof) which is stronger than other spirits like vodka but you will not trip or get high.

Absinthe is called the Green Fairy but it will not make you see any fairies!. It does give you a different kind of drunkenness though. The blend of the high alcohol content, which acts as a sedative, and the herbs, which are stimulants, can give you a very strange “clear headed” or “lucid” drunkenness – an alcohol high. Perhaps this is what artists and writers were talking about when they described Absinthe as their muse, saying that it gave them inspiration and even their genius.

Make sure when you buy your first Absinthe that you buy a quality Absinthe or that you make your own from a kit from a reputable company. Some company’s herbal steeping kits claim to make an Absinthe which contains very large amounts of thujone, much larger than vintage Absinthe. Take a look at the essences from AbsintheKit.com which are also used by the Absinthe industry.

Although the answer to the question “What is the Absinthe high like?” might disappoint some people, Absinthe is a great tasting drink which should be enjoyed.

What is in Absinthe?

Absinthe, also known as the Green Fairy, is a herbal alcoholic beverage with an anise flavor. It was the drink of La Belle Epoque period of history and of the Bohemian culture of Paris, in particular Montmartre. Absinthe fans – Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Oscar Wilde and Ernest Hemingway claimed that the drink was responsible for their genius and that it gave them inspiration – the Green Fairy was their muse. But, what is in Absinthe?

What is in Absinthe?

Henri-Louis Pernod’s Absinthe of the early 19th century was produced using a wine based alcohol which was distilled with natural herbs. It is said that his Absinthe recipe was made using the plant common wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium) and other herbs including Florence fennel, green aniseed, hyssop, lemon balm, dittany, star anise, angelica, veronica, nutmeg and juniper. Some of these herbs were used at the beginning of the process and others were used at the end to give the Absinthe its classic green or verte color.

Wormwood gave Absinthe its name (from Absinthium) and its slightly bitter taste. Roman or petite wormwood (artemisia pontica) is also sometimes used in Absinthe production.

Wormwood contains a chemical called thujone. Thujones are monoterpenes and ketones which are found in various other plants too – sage, cypress and tansy. Thujones act on the GABA receptors in the brain and can cause convulsions and muscle spasms when consumed in large quantities. They can also be toxic to organs such as the liver and brain. Thujone was thought to be similar to THC in the drug cannabis causing psychedelic effects such as hallucinations but research has shown this to be false.

Wormwood, or thujone, was responsible for the banning of Absinthe in the early 1900s. The medical profession of the time claimed that drinking Absinthe led to Absinthe addiction, Absinthism whose symptoms were:-

– Hallucinations
– Hyper excitability
– Weakening of the intellect
– Brain damage
– Insanity
– Death

These claims have now been proved false and seem to be just part of the mass hysteria promoted by the prohibition movement of the time. Absinthe, even pre ban Absinthe, only contains very small amounts of thujone and it would be impossible to ingest enough thujone to be harmful – you would die of alcohol poisoning first! There is far more thujone in sage and no one hallucinates after eating a casserole flavored with sage!

All good Absinthe contains wormwood and other essential oils. These oils allow the Absinthe to louche when water is added in Absinthe preparation and give it its wonderful anise flavor. Make sure that you buy a quality Absinthe or make your own Absinthe using a top-quality essence from AbsintheKit.com. See AbsintheKit.com for information and help regarding their Absinthe products.

Absinthe also contains alcohol and it has a very high alcohol by volume, up to 75% ABV. Care should be taken when drinking Absinthe, not because it will make you hallucinate but because it is so easy to get drunk on Absinthe especially if you are mixing it with other alcohol in cocktails.

I hope that this information has answered the question “What is in Absinthe?”. Enjoy getting to know the Green Fairy!

What is in Absinthe?

Absinthe, also known as the Green Fairy, is a herbal alcoholic beverage with an anise flavor. It was the drink of La Belle Epoque period of history and of the Bohemian culture of Paris, in particular Montmartre. Absinthe fans – Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Oscar Wilde and Ernest Hemingway claimed that the drink was responsible for their genius and that it gave them inspiration – the Green Fairy was their muse. But, what is in Absinthe?

What is in Absinthe?

Henri-Louis Pernod’s Absinthe of the early 19th century was produced using a wine based alcohol which was distilled with natural herbs. It is said that his Absinthe recipe was made using the plant common wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium) and other herbs including Florence fennel, green aniseed, hyssop, lemon balm, dittany, star anise, angelica, veronica, nutmeg and juniper. Some of these herbs were used at the beginning of the process and others were used at the end to give the Absinthe its classic green or verte color.

Wormwood gave Absinthe its name (from Absinthium) and its slightly bitter taste. Roman or petite wormwood (artemisia pontica) is also sometimes used in Absinthe production.

Wormwood contains a chemical called thujone. Thujones are monoterpenes and ketones which are found in various other plants too – sage, cypress and tansy. Thujones act on the GABA receptors in the brain and can cause convulsions and muscle spasms when consumed in large quantities. They can also be toxic to organs such as the liver and brain. Thujone was thought to be similar to THC in the drug cannabis causing psychedelic effects such as hallucinations but research has shown this to be false.

Wormwood, or thujone, was responsible for the banning of Absinthe in the early 1900s. The medical profession of the time claimed that drinking Absinthe led to Absinthe addiction, Absinthism whose symptoms were:-

– Hallucinations
– Hyper excitability
– Weakening of the intellect
– Brain damage
– Insanity
– Death

These claims have now been proved false and seem to be just part of the mass hysteria promoted by the prohibition movement of the time. Absinthe, even pre ban Absinthe, only contains very small amounts of thujone and it would be impossible to ingest enough thujone to be harmful – you would die of alcohol poisoning first! There is far more thujone in sage and no one hallucinates after eating a casserole flavored with sage!

All good Absinthe contains wormwood and other essential oils. These oils allow the Absinthe to louche when water is added in Absinthe preparation and give it its wonderful anise flavor. Make sure that you buy a quality Absinthe or make your own Absinthe using a top-quality essence from AbsintheKit.com. See AbsintheKit.com for information and help regarding their Absinthe products.

Absinthe also contains alcohol and it has a very high alcohol by volume, up to 75% ABV. Care should be taken when drinking Absinthe, not because it will make you hallucinate but because it is so easy to get drunk on Absinthe especially if you are mixing it with other alcohol in cocktails.

I hope that this information has answered the question “What is in Absinthe?”. Enjoy getting to know the Green Fairy!

What is absinthe proof

Absinthe is now one again a popular alcoholic drink, thanks to its legalization in the USA and other countries after many decades of being illegal. Many young people are trying it for the first time and knocking it back without any consideration of its alcohol content. So, what is Absinthe proof?

Absinthe is an anise flavored liquor which is made from distilling alcohol with a blend of herbs including wormwood (artemisia absinthium), aniseed and fennel. It is commonly known as the Green Fairy, La Fee Verte, because of the characteristic emerald green coloring of classic verte styles of Absinthe.

Absinthe is usually consumed diluted with iced water according to the Ritual. You have to drip the water over a sugar lump on a slotted spoon and into the Absinthe which causes the Absinthe to louche – a lovely effect.

Absinthe was banned in the early 1900s not because of its high alcohol content but because of the wormwood in it. Dr Valentin Magnan tested worwmood on guinea pigs in 1845 and found that a guinea pig given wormwood oil had convulsions, whereas, a guinea pig given alcohol just got drunk. By 1872 Magnan had isolated the chemical thujone from wormwood and, after tests on dogs, established that thujone was far more dangerous than ethanol (alcohol) and so Absinthe was much more harmful than other types of spirits. He and others in the medical profession were convinced that thujone was psychoactive and caused psychedelic effects. Absinthe was therefore banned.

Even in 1975, a nature magazine claimed that a thujone molecule was similar in structure to THC from the drug cannabis and that they therefore acted in a similar manner.

We now know that all these claims are inaccurate and false. Thujone is not like THC, although it does act on the GABA receptors of the brain, when taken in large amounts. We also know from testing Absinthes, including vintage Absinthe, that Absinthe only contains very small amounts of thujone, nowhere near enough to be harmful. You would have to drink vast amounts of Absinthe and die of alcohol poisoning before suffering any effects from thujone!

Although Absinthe will not cause us to hallucinate or convulse, it is a highly alcoholic drink which needs to be consumed with care because it will get you drunk quite quickly.

What is Absinthe proof?

Let’s see what the proof of well-known brands of Absinthe is:-

Lucid Absinthe 62% abv (124 proof)
La Clandestine Absinthe 53% abv (106 proof)
Sebor 55% abv (110 proof)
Pere Kermanns 60% abv (120 proof)
Pernod Absinthe 68% abv (136 proof0
Mari Mayans Collectors 70 70% abv (140 proof)
La Fee XS Absinthe Suisse 53% abv (106 proof)
La Fee XS Absinthe Francaise 68% abv (136 proof)
La Fee Bohemian 70% abv (140 proof)
La Fee Parisian 68% abv (136 proof)
Kubler 53 53% abv (106 proof)
Doubs Mystique Carte D’Or 65% abv (130 proof)
Roquette 1797 75% abv (150 proof)
Jade PF 1901 68% abv (136 proof)
Jade Edouard 72% abv (144 proof)
Jade Verte Suisse 65% abv (130 proof)
Jade Nouvelle Orleans 68% abv (136 proof)

If we compare that to other alcoholic beverages we can see that Absinthe is very strong:-

Absolut Blue Vodka 40% abv (80 proof)
Jose Cuervo Gold Tequila 38% abv (76 proof)
Beer tends to be 4 or 5% alcohol by volume (8-10 proof).
Table Wine 9-12% alcohol by volume (18-24 proof).
Johnnie Walker Black Label Scotch Whisky 40% alcohol by volume (80 proof).
Everclear 95% abv (190 proof)

If you make homemade Absinthe using essences from AbsintheKit.com then your homemade Absinthe’s proof will depend on what neutral alcohol you use.

What is Absinthe proof? Very high is the answer!

Absinthe is now one again a popular alcoholic drink, thanks to its legalization in the USA and other countries after many decades of being illegal. Many young people are trying it for the first time and knocking it back without any consideration of its alcohol content. So, what is Absinthe proof?

Absinthe is an anise flavored liquor which is made from distilling alcohol with a blend of herbs including wormwood (artemisia absinthium), aniseed and fennel. It is commonly known as the Green Fairy, La Fee Verte, because of the characteristic emerald green coloring of classic verte styles of Absinthe.

Absinthe is usually consumed diluted with iced water according to the Ritual. You have to drip the water over a sugar lump on a slotted spoon and into the Absinthe which causes the Absinthe to louche – a lovely effect.

Absinthe was banned in the early 1900s not because of its high alcohol content but because of the wormwood in it. Dr Valentin Magnan tested worwmood on guinea pigs in 1845 and found that a guinea pig given wormwood oil had convulsions, whereas, a guinea pig given alcohol just got drunk. By 1872 Magnan had isolated the chemical thujone from wormwood and, after tests on dogs, established that thujone was far more dangerous than ethanol (alcohol) and so Absinthe was much more harmful than other types of spirits. He and others in the medical profession were convinced that thujone was psychoactive and caused psychedelic effects. Absinthe was therefore banned.

Even in 1975, a nature magazine claimed that a thujone molecule was similar in structure to THC from the drug cannabis and that they therefore acted in a similar manner.

We now know that all these claims are inaccurate and false. Thujone is not like THC, although it does act on the GABA receptors of the brain, when taken in large amounts. We also know from testing Absinthes, including vintage Absinthe, that Absinthe only contains very small amounts of thujone, nowhere near enough to be harmful. You would have to drink vast amounts of Absinthe and die of alcohol poisoning before suffering any effects from thujone!

Although Absinthe will not cause us to hallucinate or convulse, it is a highly alcoholic drink which needs to be consumed with care because it will get you drunk quite quickly.

What is Absinthe proof?

Let’s see what the proof of well-known brands of Absinthe is:-

Lucid Absinthe 62% abv (124 proof)
La Clandestine Absinthe 53% abv (106 proof)
Sebor 55% abv (110 proof)
Pere Kermanns 60% abv (120 proof)
Pernod Absinthe 68% abv (136 proof0
Mari Mayans Collectors 70 70% abv (140 proof)
La Fee XS Absinthe Suisse 53% abv (106 proof)
La Fee XS Absinthe Francaise 68% abv (136 proof)
La Fee Bohemian 70% abv (140 proof)
La Fee Parisian 68% abv (136 proof)
Kubler 53 53% abv (106 proof)
Doubs Mystique Carte D’Or 65% abv (130 proof)
Roquette 1797 75% abv (150 proof)
Jade PF 1901 68% abv (136 proof)
Jade Edouard 72% abv (144 proof)
Jade Verte Suisse 65% abv (130 proof)
Jade Nouvelle Orleans 68% abv (136 proof)

If we compare that to other alcoholic beverages we can see that Absinthe is very strong:-

Absolut Blue Vodka 40% abv (80 proof)
Jose Cuervo Gold Tequila 38% abv (76 proof)
Beer tends to be 4 or 5% alcohol by volume (8-10 proof).
Table Wine 9-12% alcohol by volume (18-24 proof).
Johnnie Walker Black Label Scotch Whisky 40% alcohol by volume (80 proof).
Everclear 95% abv (190 proof)

If you make homemade Absinthe using essences from AbsintheKit.com then your homemade Absinthe’s proof will depend on what neutral alcohol you use.

What is Absinthe proof? Very high is the answer!